Browse "Geographical features"

Displaying 201-220 of 451 results
Article

Kettle Valley

Kettle Valley is a dry, forested area in the Okanagan Highland of southern BC. The name relates either to rock formations in the waterfalls at the confluence of the Kettle and COLUMBIA rivers in Washington state or to the shape of baskets woven by Salish people there.

Article

Kicking Horse Pass

Kicking Horse Pass is a route through the Rocky Mountains. At an elevation of 1,627 m, Kicking Horse Pass straddles the Continental Divide on the border between Alberta and British Columbia in Yoho National Park. In 1971, Kicking Horse Pass was designated a National Historic Site for its importance as a transportation corridor in Western Canada, first for Indigenous peoples, then the Canadian Pacific Railway, and finally the Trans-Canada Highway.

Article

Killiniq Island

Killiniq Island, 269 km2, is located off the northern tip of the Labrador Peninsula on the south side of the entrance to Hudson Strait. The provincial boundary passes across the island, so that its eastern portion belongs to Newfoundland and the rest is part of Nunavut.

Article

Kluane Ranges

Spruce forest is common below about 1200 m elevation, but the upper slopes of the ranges are treeless. The area supports an abundance of wildlife, including grizzly and BLACK BEAR, timber wolf, Dall sheep, mountain goat, caribou and moose.

Article

Labrador Current

The Labrador Current, famous for icebergs and once-abundant cod fish, is a southeasterly flow of water over the continental shelf and slope east of Newfoundland and Labrador, between Hudson Strait and the southern tip of the Grand Banks.

Article

Labrador Highlands

Formed of ancient Precambrian rocks and heavily glaciated during the Quaternary (1.65 million to 10 000 years ago), the mountains support more than 70 small glaciers, the southernmost in eastern North America.

Article

Labrador Sea

Labrador Sea is the body of water between Greenland and the coast of Labrador. It is 3400 m deep and 1000 km wide where it joins the North Atlantic and shallows to less than 700 m where DAVIS STRAIT separates it from BAFFIN BAY.

Article

Lac à l' Eau Claire

Lac à l'Eau Claire, 1383 km2, elevation 241 m, max length 71 km, is located in northwestern Québec about 133 km east of the southeastern shore of Hudson Bay. Probably formed by the impact of a METEORITE, the lake drains west via Rivière à l'Eau Claire into Lac GUILLAUME-DELISLE.

Article

Lac Bienville

Lac Bienville, 1249 km2, elevation 426 m, maximum length 89 km, is located in a sparsely populated region of northern Québec. This elongated lake, dotted with numerous islands, is fed by Lacs Louet and Ossant. It drains west, via the Grande Rivière de la Baleine (Great Whale River), into Hudson Bay.

Article

Lac Guillaume-Delisle

Lac Guillaume-Delisle, 712 km2, is a large, triangular, saltwater lake in northern Québec, connected to the eastern shore of Hudson Bay by Le Goulet, a 5 km long narrow channel.

Article

Lac la Martre

Lac la Martre, 1777 km2, elev 265 m, max length 76 km, is located in the Northwest Territories, 50 km west of Behchokò and 150 km northwest of Yellowknife, and 346 km south of the Arctic Circle. The settlement of WHATÌ is located at the southeastern corner of the lake.

Article

Lac La Ronge

Lac La Ronge, 1414 km2, elevation 364 m, is located in the rugged, sparsely populated Canadian Shield country of central Saskatchewan, 235 km north of Prince Albert. About 58 km long and studded with many islands, it drains northeast via the Rapid River into the Churchill River.

Article

Lac Mégantic (lake)

Lac Mégantic, 26 km2, elev 395 m, 75 m deep, is located in a depression of the Appalachians in southern Québec, 6 km from the US border. LAC-MÉGANTIC, the only town of the region, is located at its outlet, which is the source of the Rivière CHAUDIÈRE.

Article

Lac Mistassini

Lac Mistassini, 2335 km2, elevation 372 m, max length 161 km and width 19 km, is located in central Québec, 360 km east of JAMES BAY and 220 km northwest of Lac SAINT-JEAN.

Article

Lac Saint-Jean

The Kakouchaks, the local population of Innu, began trading with the Europeans at TADOUSSAC in the 16th century. Later, Lac Saint-Jean was made part of the King's Domain (1674), land reserved for trapping and farmed out to interested parties; a first trading post was built at Métabetchouane in 1676.

Article

Lac Seul

Lac Seul, 1658 km2, elev 357 m, 55 m deep, located in northwestern Ontario, 50 km N of Dryden, drains W via the English and Winnipeg rivers to Lk Winnipeg.