Browse "Science & Technology"

Macleans

Wired Revolution on Campus

Nursing professor Ellie MacFarlane is a self-confessed "technological klutz," the type of person who finds programming a videocassette recorder a daunting experience. So it was with some trepidation that she learned last year that St.

Macleans

Wireless hang-up

Ottawa’s unprecedented efforts to woo Verizon have sparked a fierce backlash from Canada’s carriers, and questions about what’s really best for Canadian consumers

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Women and Health

If life expectancy is any indication of health, Canadian women are, on average, much healthier than they were 70 years ago. The life expectancy of female babies born in 1921 was 61 while female babies born today are expected to live to age 82.

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Woodenware

Woodenware, or treen, simple, small objects made entirely of wood, usually by home craftsmen who were their own carpenters, joiners, carvers and turners. Normally, woodenware was made from a single piece of wood (block or plank, rough or milled), cut, hollowed or turned but rarely joined.

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Zooarchaeology

 In Canada most zooarchaeologists study teeth, bone and marine shells, because these materials are commonly preserved on archaeological sites. Preservation of specimens depends on what happened to them before burial, the rate at which they were buried, and the burial environment.

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de Havilland Beaver

De Havilland Beaver, DHC-2, successor to the NOORDUYN NORSEMAN as the all-purpose bush plane of the Canadian North. Its specifications were based on results of a questionnaire circulated by "Punch" DICKINS , and it

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de Havilland Caribou

De Havilland Caribou, DHC-4, twin-engined STOL aircraft capable of taking off in only 220 m. It was characterized by the sharp upward angle of the rear fuselage, providing access for large loads. It first flew July 1958, and was used mostly in a military role.

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de Havilland Dash 7

De Havilland Dash 7, DHC-7, STOL aircraft designed for efficient transport from city centres. It first flew March 1975 after a long development costing $120 million, four-fifths of which was paid by the federal government. Its