Browse "Plants"

Displaying 81-100 of 161 results
Article

Lobstick

Lobstick (or lopstick) is a tall, conspicuously situated spruce or pine tree with all but its topmost branches stripped or lopped off. This was done by northern Aboriginal people, and later by voyageurs, to turn trees into talismans, landmarks or memorials.

Article

Locoweed

Locoweed is the common name for plants of the genera Astragalus and Oxytropis in the pea family.

Article

Lupine

Lupine (Latin lupus, "wolf," from the belief that it robs the soil), is the common name for several annual or perennial herbaceous plant species in the pea family.

Article

Maple Trees in Canada

Maples are trees and shrubs in the genus Acer, previously classified within the maple family Aceraceae, but now placed by some taxonomists in Sapindaceae (Soapberry family), which also includes horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastaneum). There are approximately 150 species of maple around the world, most in the temperate zone of the Northern Hemisphere, and the majority native to eastern Asia. Ten maple species are native to Canada, perhaps the best known being sugar maple (Acer saccharum) of eastern Canada and the northeastern United States. The Canadian flag displays a stylized maple leaf, and maple is Canada’s official arboreal emblem. Maples are not only important to Canada symbolically, they are also ecologically and economically significant.

Article

Mayflower

Mayflower, common name for the trailing arbutus (Epigaea repens), a creeping, woody, evergreen plant belonging to the heath family.

Article

Medicinal Crops

About a third of the world's estimated 400 000 species of higher or vascular plants have probably been used for medicinal purposes by indigenous societies, generally in a raw or minimally processed form.

Article

Milkweed

Milkweed is the common name for perennial, herbaceous plants of genus Asclepias, family Asclepiadaceae (from Greek physician Asclepius).

Article

Mint

Mint belongs to the mint family (Lamiaceae, also called Labiatae), a large plant family that also includes several aromatic and ornamental plants like basil, rosemary, oregano, thyme, coleus and sage.

Article

Mistletoe

Mistletoe family, Loranthaceae, includes about 30 genera and over 1000 species. It is predominantly tropical but has members in temperate regions.

Article

Montréal Biodôme

Opened in 1992 and located in the former Olympic velodrome, the Montréal Biodôme is part of the “Space for Life” network, which includes Montréal’s Insectarium, Planetarium and Botanical Garden.

Article

Morning Glory

The morning glory family, containing 1200 species of herbaceous plants, is represented in Canada by cultivated common morning glory and 3 related species; 11 species of climbing, parasitic dodders; and 5 species of bindweed.

Article

Moss

The sporophyte produces spores that are wind dispersed. Some spores germinate into new gametophyte plants. Gametophyte plants produce sex cells (eggs, sperm) that undergo fertilization to produce another sporophyte.

Article

Mountain Ash

Mountain Ash (Sorbus) are a genus of small trees or shrubs of the rose family (Rosaceae), consisting of perhaps 100 species distributed in temperate Eurasia and North America.

Article

Mountain Avens

Mountain avens is the common name for dwarf, trailing or mat-forming shrubs in genus Dryas of the rose family (Rosaceae).

Article

Mycorrhizae

Associations between PLANT roots and FUNGI are mycorrhizae and are thought to occur on roots of 95% of all SEED PLANTS. They are probably essential to the survival in nature of both partners. The plant derives an enhanced ability to absorb essential minerals and greater resistance to root diseases.

Article

National Parks of Canada

Canada’s national parks are protected areas established under federal legislation to preserve Canada’s natural heritage. They are administered by Parks Canada, a government agency that evolved from the world’s first national parks service, the Dominion Parks Branch, established in 1911. The National Parks System Plan, developed in 1970, divided Canada into 39 natural regions and set the goal of representing each region with at least one national park. Canada now has 48 national parks and national park reserves in 30 of these regions. In total, the parks cover more than 340,000 km2, which is over 3 per cent of Canada’s landmass. They protect important land and marine habitats, geographical features and sites of cultural significance. National parks also benefit local economies and the tourism industry in Canada.

Article

Nightshade

Eight species of Solanum occur in Canada, of which only S. carolinense (horse or ball nettle), found in southern Ontario, is native. The most familiar nightshade found across Canada is S. dulcamara (climbing nightshade or European bittersweet).