Browse "Plants"

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Endangered Plants in Canada

A species is endangered if there are threats to its survival. Plants are put at risk for several reasons, including: climate change and the loss of natural habitat to cities, agriculture and industry. In Canada, these activities threaten entire natural ecosystems, such as older forests and Prairie grasslands. As of 2018, a total of 771 species were considered at risk in Canada, including 240 plants. (Other species at risk include animals; see also Endangered Animals in Canada).

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Fern

Fern, common name for a diverse group (division Polypodiophyta) of usually perennial, spore-producing plants with divided, evergreen or deciduous leaves (fronds) arising from slender, horizontal rhizomes (underground stems) or stout, ascending rootstalks.

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Fiddleheads

The term fiddlehead is used to refer to plants in 3 ways: (1) the young curled leaf of any fern; (2) the ostrich fern (Matteuccia struthiopteris of the Aspidaceae family); and (3) the young curled leaf of the ostrich fern used as a vegetable (often called fiddlehead greens).

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Fir

Fir, Scandinavian for "pine," designates the "true" firs, which are evergreen conifers (genus Abies) of the pine family (Pinaceae). About 50 species occur worldwide, all in the Northern Hemisphere; 4 are native to Canada. Balsam fir (A. balsamea) occurs from Alberta to the Atlantic Provinces.

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Fireweed

Fireweed, common name for Epilobium angustifolium, a member of a genus of herbaceous or shrubby plants of the evening primrose family (Onagraceae).

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Forage Crops

Forage refers to plants consumed by animals, particularly livestock. Forage may be preserved by drying the plants to produce hay, it may be fermented to produce silage, and dried material is also compressed to produce compacted hay, pellets, and cubes .

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Forest

Main Forest TypesWorldwide there are 3 main forest types related directly to climatic zones: equatorial- and tropical-region forests, temperate-zone forests, and forests associated with colder climates.

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Forest Fire

A forest fire is a moving combustion reaction, spreading outwards in a band from its ignition point, leaving burned-out forest behind it. On average, about 7,600 forest fires occur annually in Canada.

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Forest Harvesting

Forest harvesting involves cutting trees and delivering them to sawmills, pulp mills and other wood-processing plants. Its practical components include road construction, logging and log transportation.

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Forest Regions

A forest region is a major geographic belt or zone characterized by a broad uniformity both in physiography and in the composition of the dominant tree species. Canada can be divided into eight forest regions.

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Forest Survey

Foresters use forest surveys to obtain information on the condition of the FOREST and monitor any changes, since there are not only surveys of standing trees, but also surveys after logging as well as forestry surveys aimed at prescribing treatments.

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Forestry

Forestry is the science and practice of caring for forests. Both the meaning and practice of forestry in Canada have evolved over time.

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Forestry Education

Throughout the late 1980s and the 1990s, there was a tremendous evolution of FORESTRY in Canada and around the world. Forestry became increasingly important for both the ECONOMY and the ENVIRONMENT, and the practice of forestry became more complex.

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Gentian

Several plants of family Gentianaceae, of the genus Gentiana, are commonly known as gentian.

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Geranium

Geranium, annual, biennial or perennial plant of genus Geranium, family Geraniaceae, with opposite, palmate and often divided leaves.

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Ginseng

Ginseng is a herbaceous perennial plant of genus Panax, ginseng family (Araliaceae), discovered in North America by Joseph-François Lafitau.

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Goldenrod

Goldenrod, genus Solidago, showy, perennial, herbaceous plant of the Compositae or Asteraceae family.

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Grasses

Emergence of GrasslandsGrasslands began to appear about 25 million years ago, changing the face of much of the world and providing food for grazing animals. Grasses and grazers evolved together. Grasses benefit because grazers control the growth of competing species and provide fertilizers.