Browse "Towns"

Displaying 281-300 of 379 results
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Rosetown

Rosetown, Sask, incorporated as a town in 1911, population 2317 (2011c), 2277 (2006c). The Town of Rosetown is located 115 km southwest of SASKATOON. It is a focal point for the major transportation routes of the region and is

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Rosthern

In 1891 and 1892 a group of Mennonite farmers, several from the Manitoba settlements, arrived in the area. Dr Seager WHEELER, a pioneer in scientific agriculture, had his farm in the area; it is now a national historic site.

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Rothesay

Rothesay, NB, incorporated as a town in 1998, population 11 947 (2011c), 11 637 (2006c). It is situated on the eastern side of the Kennebecasis River, 22 km northeast of Saint John.

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Russell (Man)

Russell, Manitoba, incorporated as a village in 1907 and as a town in 1913, population 1669 (2011c), 1590 (2006c). The Town of Russell is an agricultural service centre 350 km northwest of Winnipeg near the Manitoba-Saskatchewan border.

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Sackville

Sackville, NB, incorporated as a town in 1903, population 5558 (2011c), 5411 (2006c). Sackville is situated 50 km southeast of Moncton on the Tantramar River, near the Nova Scotia border.

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Saint Andrews (NB)

Saint Andrews, NB, incorporated as a town in 1903, population 1889 (2011c), 1798 (2006c). The Town of Saint Andrews is located at the mouth of the ST CROIX RIVER in the southwest corner of New Brunswick.

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Saint-Basile-le-Grand

Saint-Basile-le-Grand, Qué, Town, pop 15 605 (2006c), 12 385 (2001c), inc 1969. Saint-Basile-le-Grand is located between Mont Saint-Bruno and the Rivière RICHELIEU about 35 km east of MONTRÉAL.

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Saint-Quentin

Saint-Quentin, NB, incorporated as a town in 1992, population 2095 (2011c), 2250 (2006c). The Town of Saint-Quentin is located in northern New Brunswick in the Appalachian Highlands between the RESTIGOUCHE and MIRAMICHI rivers and tributaries of the SAINT JOHN RIVER.

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Saint-Raymond

Saint-Raymond's industrial activity has always been closely linked to the forest industry. Sawmilling, pulp and paper, wood products, house and cottage manufacturing as well as charcoal production, are still key economic activities.

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Sainte-Adèle

In the mid-1840s, as conditions worsened in the seigneuries, settlers came to the area called Les Cantons du nord, later, Les Pays-d'en-haut. The coming of the railway at the turn of the century assisted colonization and the establishment of the tourist industry in the area.

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Sainte-Agathe-des-Monts

In the 19th century, Sainte-Agathe had only a few sawmills, but the construction of the Montreal and Occidental Railway in 1892 (replaced by the CPR in 1900) encouraged tourism and the development of the hotels that have become the region's economic mainstay.

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Sainte-Anne-des-Monts

In 1863 the area became known as the Parish of Sainte-Anne-des-Monts. The first settlers named it in memory of their native parish of Sainte-Anne-de-la-Pocatière in France. In 1968, it became the city of Sainte-Anne-des-Monts.

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Sault Ste Marie

Sault Ste Marie, Ontario, incorporated as a town in 1887 and as a city in 1912, population 73,368 (2016 census), 75,141 (2011 census). The city of Sault Ste Marie is located adjacent to the rapids of the St Marys River between lakes Superior and Huron. Across the river is the American city of the same name. Sault Ste Marie sits on the traditional territory of the Ojibwe, who called the site Bawating (“place of the rapids”) and valued it for its access to the upper Great Lakes and as a source of abundant whitefish and maple sugar. It is popularly called “the Sault,” or “Soo.”

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Selkirk

Selkirk, Manitoba, incorporated as a town in 1882 and as a city in 1998, population 9834 (2011c), 9515 (2006c). The City of Selkirk is located on the west bank of the RED RIVER, 29 km north of Winnipeg.

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Senneterre

Senneterre, Qué, Town, pop 2993 (2006c), 3275 (2001c), inc 1956. Senneterre is located 130 km east of ROUYN-NORANDA along the banks of the Rivière Bell in Québec's Abitibi-Témiscamingue region. It was

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Shaunavon

During the late 19th and early 20th centuries ranching was the primary activity in the area and from 1910 the ranchers were forced to share the land with grain farmers. In 1913 the CPR extended its line into the area and the Shaunavon site developed.

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Shawinigan-Sud

The name Shawinigan, of Algonquin origin, means "portage on the crest." This refers to the crest of rocks that had to be climbed in order to portage around the majestic waterfall.