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Editorial

Editorial: Newfoundland’s Contribution to the Patriation of the Constitution

The following article is an editorial written by The Canadian Encyclopedia staff. Editorials are not usually updated.

In the decades since 1982, politicians and the media have recounted the same story about the patriation of Canada’s constitution and the adoption of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Most of the credit in this version goes to Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau. Three others are credited with breaking an impasse in the 1981 negotiations: federal justice minister Jean Chrétien, Saskatchewan attorney general Roy Romanow, and Ontario attorney general Roy McMurtry. But in his memoirs, former Newfoundland Premier Brian Peckford argues that the key intervention in the patriation process came from Peckford and the members of the Newfoundland delegation.

Editorial

The First Thanksgiving in North America

The following article is an editorial written by The Canadian Encyclopedia staff. Editorials are not usually updated.

It has become common knowledge that the first Thanksgiving in North America was held by Sir Martin Frobisher and his crew in Nunavut in 1578. There are those — mainly Americans upset by the thought of having their holiday co-opted — who argue that it wasn't a “real” Thanksgiving. I would counter that Frobisher had reason to give thanks, and that giving thanks was an important aspect of Elizabethan society, so it would have been a natural thing for him and his men to do.

Article

Vancouver Feature: Bloody Sunday

The following article is a feature from our Vancouver Feature series. Past features are not updated.


That stately building at the northwest corner of Hastings and Granville is known as the Sinclair Centre today. It houses federal offices, upscale clothing shops and a small mall. It was once Vancouver’s main Post Office, the site of “Bloody Sunday,” a violent Depression-era clash between police and unemployed workers.

Article

Vancouver Feature: BC Electric Building Opens

The following article is a feature from our Vancouver Feature series. Past features are not updated.


When BC Electric chairman Dal Grauer decided to move to new headquarters south of Georgia Street, he wanted a building that would symbolize optimism and progress. What he got was a gleaming 21-storey modernist structure that glowed with electric light 24 hours a day.

Editorial

Vancouver Feature: Canada’s First Gas Station Opens for Business

The following article is a feature from our Vancouver Feature series. Past features are not updated.


The first gasoline-powered automobile had arrived in Vancouver in 1904, and there were not many more by 1907. But that year someone in the local Imperial Oil office determined that filling cars with a bucket and funnel was not very safe. So the first Canadian filling station — a hot-water tank and a garden hose — was set up at the company’s storage yard at Cambie and Smithe.

Article

Toronto Feature: Hurricane Hazel

This article is from our Toronto Feature series. Features from past programs are not updated.

Hurricane Hazel was one of the most devastating and unpredictable tropical storms of the 20th century. It was first identified on 5 October 1954, in the Caribbean, where it smashed into Haiti and then battered the Carolinas. The storm struck Toronto on 15 October with winds of 124 km/h and record rainfall.