Search for "Alberta"

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Sylvan Lake

Sylvan Lake, Alberta, incorporated as a village in 1913 and as a town in 1946, population 14,816 (2016 census), 12,362 (2011 census). The town of Sylvan Lake is located on the south shore of the lake of the same name in central Alberta, approximately 20 km west of Red Deer. The origin of the name is descriptive. The area was once heavily forested and the name is based on the Latin word sylva, which means wood or forest. The lake was known variously as Snake (by the Cree and Stoney-Nakoda), and Methy or Swan (by 19th century explorers). In 1909, a local resident, Mrs. Green, circulated a petition to change the lake’s name to Sylvan Lake.

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Grande Prairie

Grande Prairie, AB, incorporated as a city in 1958, population 63,166 (2016 census), 55,655 (2011 census). The city of Grande Prairie is located 456 km northwest of Edmonton and takes its name from the large prairie that lies to the east, north and west of it. The city is the business and transportation centre of Alberta’s Peace River region.

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Cold Lake

Cold Lake, Alberta, incorporated as a city in 2000, population 14,961 (2016 census), 13,839 (2011 census). The city of Cold Lake is located on a lake of the same name, 290 km northeast of Edmonton. The  Cree called the lake “Kinosoo” or “big fish” after a Cree legend. European settlers named the lake for its deep, cold water.

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Red Deer

Red Deer, Alberta, incorporated as a city in 1913, population 100,418 (2016 census), 90,564 (2011 census). The city of Red Deer is located on the Red Deer River, 150 km south of Edmonton. The Cree applied the name “Elk” to the river, but Scottish fur traders appear to have confused elk with the red deer of their homeland.

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Lloydminster

Lloydminster, Alberta and Saskatchewan, incorporated as a city in 1958, population 19,645 in Alberta and 11,765 in Saskatchewan (2016 census); 18,032 in Alberta and 9,772 in Saskatchewan (2011 census). The city of Lloydminster is known as the “Border City” since it is located on the Saskatchewan-Alberta border, about 275 km west of Saskatoon and 250 km east of Edmonton. It is one of two communities in Canada split by a provincial boundary, the other being Flin Flon, Manitoba.

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Medicine Hat

Medicine Hat, Alberta, incorporated as a city in 1906, population 63,260 (2016 census), 60,005 (2011 census). The city of Medicine Hat is one of Alberta's largest cities. It is located on the Canadian Pacific Railway main line and the Trans-Canada Highway in the southeastern corner of the province, bisected by the South Saskatchewan River. Canada's “sunniest” city, Medicine Hat averages 330 days of sunshine per year. A council of eight councillors and a mayor govern the city.

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Beaumont

Beaumont, Alberta, incorporated as a village in 1973, as a town in 1980 and as a city in 2019, population 17,396 (2016 census), 13,284 (2011 census). The city of Beaumont is located immediately south of Edmonton’s city boundary.

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Reserves in Alberta

There are 138 reserves in Alberta. Members of Alberta’s 47 First Nations live in these communities. In addition, two First Nations — Salt River and Onion Lake Cree — are based in other provinces or territories, but have reserve land in Alberta. In 2018, there were 129,962 registered Indians living in Alberta, 61 per cent of whom lived on reserves. The remainder live in other municipalities. First Nations in Alberta are typically grouped into three areas based on Treaties 6, 7 and 8 (see also Numbered Treaties). While historically the Canadian government assigned reserves to First Nations people and not Métis or Inuit, Alberta is the only province in which Métis people were given a collective land base (see Métis Settlements).

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Alberta

Alberta, the westernmost of Canada's three Prairie provinces, shares many physical features with its neighbours to the east, Saskatchewan and  Manitoba. The Rocky Mountains form the southern portion of Alberta's western boundary with British Columbia. Alberta was named after Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, fourth daughter of Queen Victoria. The province is home to the country’s largest deposits of oil and natural gas.

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Writing-On-Stone Provincial Park

Writing-on-Stone Provincial Park is located in southern Alberta, just north of the Canada-US border. To the Siksikaitsitapi (Blackfoot Nation), the site is known as Áísínai’pi, which means “it is pictured” or “it is written” in the Blackfoot language. The park features thousands of rock paintings and carvings created by the Siksikaitsitapi, most of which date to 1050 BCE. Established as a provincial park in 1957, Áísínai’pi was designated a National Historic Site in 2004, and a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2019.

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History of Settlement in the Canadian Prairies

The Canadian Prairies were peopled in six great waves of migration, spanning from prehistory to the present. The migration from Asia, about 13,300 years ago, produced an Indigenous population of 20,000 to 50,000 by about 1640. Between 1640 and 1840, several thousand European and Canadian fur traders arrived, followed by several hundred British immigrants. They created dozens of small outposts and a settlement in the Red River Colony, where the Métis became the largest part of the population. The third wave, from the 1840s to the 1890s, consisted mainly but not solely of Canadians of British heritage. The fourth and by far the largest wave was drawn from many nations, mostly European. It occurred from 1897 to 1929, with a pause (1914–22) during and after the First World War. The fifth wave, drawn from other Canadian provinces and from Europe and elsewhere, commenced in the late 1940s. It lasted through the 1960s. The sixth wave, beginning in the 1970s, drew especially upon peoples of the southern hemisphere. It has continued, with fluctuations, to the present. Throughout the last century, the region has also steadily lost residents, as a result of migration to other parts of Canada, to the United States, and elsewhere.