Browse "Sports"

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Canadian Junior Hockey

Since 1970, Canadian junior hockey has been divided into two categories: Major Junior and Junior A. Canadian Major Junior hockey is governed by the Canadian Hockey League (CHL) that encompasses the three big Canadian Leagues.

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Canadian Open

The Canadian Open is an annual event run by the Royal Canadian Golf Association for professionals and amateurs who qualify. It is the fourth-oldest national GOLF championship in the world, having first been played in 1904 at the Royal Montreal Golf Club.

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Canadian Ski Marathon

In 1967 several hundred cross-country skiers led by former Canadian National Ski team member, Don MacLeod, celebrated the Centennial year by skiing 100 miles (160 km) from Montréal to Ottawa.

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Canadian Ski Museum

The Canadian Ski Museum opened in Ottawa, Ont 10 May 1971 to honour the sport of SKIING (see alsoFREESTYLE SKIING, CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING and SKI JUMPING). It was originally known as the National Ski Museum.

Macleans

CFL Given New Life

IN THE FREEWHEELING, high-scoring CANADIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE, games are often decided in the last seconds. The Toronto-Calgary matchup at SkyDome last week wasn't one of those games.

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Chess

About 20% of adult Canadians play at least one game of chess a year. These games are mostly played for fun in backyards and basements, but for several thousand tournament players chess is a serious game.

Macleans

Chess Master Beats Computer

"I remain a cautious optimist in the progress of the human brain," Garry Kasparov told reporters during a historic chess match last week. "I still believe that there are some horizons it will be very difficult for a computer to cross.

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Chuckwagon Races

Chuckwagon races have become modified horse races; since 1923, races have concluded, not by firing up the stove, but by crossing the finish line in front of the grandstand, and, instead of draft horse teams, entrants use thoroughbreds.

Macleans

Class act

Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir rose above politics and scandal to show what it means to be Olympic greats

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Coloured Hockey League

The Coloured Hockey League of the Maritimes (CHL) was an all-Black men's hockey league founded in 1895 in Halifax, NS. Organized by Black Baptists and Black intellectuals, the league was designed as a way to attract young Black men to Sunday worship with the promise of a recreational hockey match between rival churches following religious services. Later, with the influence of the Black Nationalism Movement of the period — and with rising interest in the sport of hockey — the league came to be seen as a potential driving force for the equality of Black Canadians.

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Competitive Cycling in Canada

Bicycle racing comprises many events, from short-distance sprints on banked velodromes to road races covering distances of 30 to over 5,000 km, as well as mountain bike, BMX and para-cycling competitions. Canadians have made their mark in international cycling, including podium finishes at major competitions like the Olympics/Paralympics and world championships.

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Conn Smythe Trophy

The Conn Smythe Trophy is awarded annually to the player judged most valuable to his team in the National Hockey League’s Stanley Cup playoffs. The player is selected by the Professional Hockey Writers’ Association following the final game of the playoffs. The trophy was first presented in 1964 in honour of Conn Smythe, former coach, manager and owner of the Toronto Maple Leafs. However, the only Maple Leaf to win the award is Dave Keon (1967). Two-time winners include Bobby Orr (1970, 1972), Bernie Parent (1974, 1975), Wayne Gretzky (1985, 1988),  Mario Lemieux (1991, 1992) and Sidney Crosby (2016, 2017), while Patrick Roy won the award three times (1986, 1993, 2001). Five players have won the trophy despite their team losing the Stanley Cup Final: Roger Crozier (1966), Glenn Hall (1968), Reggie Leach (1976), Ron Hextall (1987) and Jean-Sébastien Giguère (2003).

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Cricket (Game)

In September 1844, teams from Canada and the United States of America met in what was arguably the first international match in cricket history, and perhaps even the first international sporting fixture in the world.