Browse "Transportation"

Displaying 41-60 of 96 results
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Ferries

Although the Scandinavians claim to have pioneered the RO-RO concept, the first purpose-built RO-RO ferry was the Motor Princess, launched at Esquimalt, BC, in 1923 for Canadian Pacific. It ended its long career with British Columbia Ferry Corporation in the 1970s as the Pender Queen.

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Hector

Hector, the brig which carried 178 Scottish immigrants to the Pictou area of northern Nova Scotia in 1773.

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Helicopter

Control was the problem, and the men who showed the way to the practical helicopter were Juan de la Cierva of Spain, with his autogyros, Heinrich Rocke of Germany and Igor Ivanovich Sikorsky of Russia and the US.

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Humboldt Broncos Bus Crash

One of Canada’s most high-profile highway tragedies occurred on 6 April 2018, when a bus carrying 28 members of the Humboldt Broncos junior hockey team collided with a transport truck at a highway intersection near Tisdale, Saskatchewan. The crash killed 16 team members: 10 players and 6 staff. It also led to new truck-driver training and licensing regulations and increased awareness about the availability and use of seat belts among bus passengers.

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Icebreakers

Icebreakers were first used in the Canadian Arctic in the 1920s to deliver supplies and services to Native and isolated settlements during the short summer season, and to back up claims of Canadian sovereignty over the NORTHWEST PASSAGE and ARCTIC ARCHIPELAGO.

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Irrigation

Irrigation is warranted where the CLIMATE is essentially arid or semiarid and is characterized by low and unpredictable precipitation (see RAIN).

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Lac-Mégantic Rail Disaster

In the early morning of 6 July 2013, a runaway train hauling 72 tankers filled with crude oil derailed as it approached the centre of the town of Lac-Mégantic, Quebec. The tanker cars exploded and the oil caught fire, killing 47 people and destroying many buildings and other infrastructure in the town centre. The fourth deadliest railway disaster in Canadian history, the derailment led to changes in rail transport safety rules as well as legal action against the company and employees involved in the incident. Years after the derailment, re-building was still ongoing and many of the town’s residents continued to suffer from post-traumatic stress.

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Mackenzie Highway

Eighty km northwest of Enterprise, a ferry connects with the highway to Yellowknife, and connecting roads to the east serve Fort Resolution and Fort Smith. The section from Enterprise to Hay River is now a separate highway. First built as an all-weather road, some of its length has been paved.

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Mackinaw Boat

Mackinaw Boat, a strong flat-bottomed boat, pointed at each end and with a hold in the middle, was used by fur traders during the French regime for running downstream. It was later adapted for open water by the addition of 2 sails and a steering oar. By the 1870s a distinctive type, 6.7 m to 8.

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Mary Celeste

Mary Celeste was a brigantine built in 1861 at Spencer's Island, Nova Scotia, and originally named Amazon. She was wrecked off Cape Breton in 1867, salvaged, sold and in 1868 registered at New York and renamed Mary Celeste. In 1872 she was found adrift off the Azores, with no sign of her crew.

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McKee Trophy

 McKee Trophy, award given annually for contribution to the advancement of Canadian aviation. It was donated by J. Dalzell McKee, an American sportsman pilot, who completed the first flight of a seaplane across Canada in 1926.

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Montréal Metro

The Montréal metro opened on 14 October 1966. The second Canadian subway system after Toronto’s, which opened in 1954, the Montréal metro was the first subway in North America to run on rubber tires instead of metal wheels.

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Music about Transportation

Of the various means of travel by land, sea, and air, only the railways, with the rhythmic clickety-clack of the wheels and the scream of the locomotive whistle, have provided an obvious subject for imitation in music.

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Newfie Bullet

An affectionate but ironic name informally applied to the transinsular Newfoundland passenger railway in its latter days.

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Noorduyn Norseman

The first bush plane of all-Canadian origin, Noorduyn Norseman was designed after consultations with bush pilots and built in Montréal by R.B.C. (Bob) Noorduyn. It was a rugged, single-engined craft, with the large

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Noronic

Noronic was a Great Lakes steamer of the Canada Steamship Lines Ltd, built at Port Arthur, Ontario, in 1913. It was consumed by fire in Toronto at dockside on 17 September 1949. There was a tragic delay in summoning the fire department and 119 people died.