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Chartered Banks in Canada

Chartered banks, sometimes known as commercial banks, are public corporations that are licensed by the federal government to operate a banking business within Canada. By issuing these licenses (or charters), the Canadian government regulates and controls the country’s economy by influencing the amount, availability and distribution of money, and the terms or cost of accessing and distributing that money (interest rates). Chartered banks are regulated by the federal Bank Act and supervised by the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions. Chartered banks in Canada accept deposits from the public and extend loans (such as mortgages) for personal, commercial, and other purposes. Banks also own and operate trust companies, securities dealers and insurance companies and offer such services as investment banking, international banking and more.

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Cheese and Cheese Making

In Canada, 408,197 tonnes of cheese were produced in 2012; per capita consumption was 12.18 kg, consisting of 3.9 kg of cheddar, 7.54 kg of mozzarella and other specialty cheeses, and 0.74 kg of cottage cheese.

Article

CHUM Limited

CHUM Limited, controlled by Allan Waters, and headquartered in Toronto, is one of Canada's largest radio and television broadcasting holding companies.

Macleans

CIBC-TD Merger

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on April 27, 1998. Partner content is not updated.

This time, Paul Martin kept his cool. Last January, the Bank of Montreal and Royal Bank announced plans to merge and create one superbank, with assets of $453 billion.

Macleans

Cinar Scandal

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on March 20, 2000. Partner content is not updated.

As first days at the office go, it was the most bizarre in Peter Moss's career. On March 6, he reported for his first day as president of entertainment for Montreal-based children's TV programmer Cinar Corp. Moss arrived to find "the whole place had been turned upside down," he recalls.

Article

CINARS

CINARS International Exchange for Performers/Conférence, then Commerce international des arts de la scène. Event promoting the performing arts, which was founded in Montreal in 1983 by Alain Paré, who was vice-president and director general in 1991.

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Clothing Industries

Mass production of clothing in Canada began in the mid-19th century in urban centres, which supplied pools of semi-skilled labour and were the major consumer markets.

Macleans

CN Back on the Rails

"The guy was working full time on GM's property and he was driving a Ford," Paul Tellier sputters, his native French bending vowels as he delivers the punch line to his anecdote.

Macleans

CN Cuts 3,000 More Jobs

Necessary downsizing or corporate greed? Canadian National Railway Co.’s announcement last week of plans to slash 3,000 jobs quickly prompted those diametrically opposed views. CN executives said the cuts were required to make the company more competitive.

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Coal Mining

A carbonaceous fossil fuel, coal has a long history as the key energy source in the transition to industrialization, beginning in 17th-century Europe.

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Cobourg and Peterborough Railway

One of the 2 earliest railway charters granted in Canada, the Cobourg Rail Road Co was incorporated in 1834 to build a railway from Cobourg northward to Peterborough across Rice Lake. The project was shelved until 1846, when it was revived as the Cobourg and Rice Lake Plank Road and Ferry Co. Samuel Gore built his plank road the 17 km to the lake, but it barely survived the first 2 winters.

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Cod Moratorium of 1992

On 2 July 1992, the federal government banned cod fishing along Canada’s east coast. This moratorium ended nearly five centuries of cod fishing in Newfoundland and Labrador. Cod had played a central role in the province’s economy and culture.

The aim of the policy was to help restore cod stocks that had been depleted due to overfishing. Today, the cod population remains too low to support a full-scale fishery. For this reason, the ban is still largely in place.

Click here for definitions of key terms used in this article.

Article

Commodities in Canada

In commerce, commodities are interchangeable goods or services. Many natural resources in Canada are viewed as commodities. They are a major source of the country’s wealth. Examples of commodities include a barrel of crude oil, an ounce of gold, or a contract to clear snow during the winter. Commodity products often supply the production of other goods or services. Many are widely traded in futures exchanges (see Commodity Trading).

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Company Towns

Company towns, important in Canada's capital formation and industrialization, urban development, and trade-union movement.

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Computer Industry

Hardware Historically, computer hardware has been divided into 3 broad classes: large mainframe computers, somewhat smaller minicomputers and the personal computers (PCs) or microcomputers that have become familiar office and home fixtures since the mid-1980s.