Browse "Islands"

Displaying 21-40 of 84 results
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Deer Island

Deer Island abuts the border with the US at the entrance to Passamaquoddy Bay on the south coast of New Brunswick. Long in dispute with the US, sovereignty over the island passed to NB in 1817. The name is probably descriptive. Fishing is the most important economic activity.

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Devon Island

The Truelove Lowland area of the island has diverse vegetation and wildlife, an abundance of soil water in the summer owing to blocked drainage, and greater precipitation and higher summer temperatures (4° to 8°C), with more clear days than other parts of the island.

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Ellef Ringnes Island

Ellef Ringnes Island, 11 295 km2, is part of the SVERDRUP group that borders the Arctic Ocean. Most of the island consists of great thicknesses of sedimentary rock, except for an occurrence of the arctic coastal plain in the northwest corner.

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Ellesmere Island

Ellesmere Island, at 196,236 km2, is the third-largest island in Canada, the 10th-largest island in the world and the most northerly island in the Arctic Archipelago. It is located in Nunavut and is separated from Greenland by Kane Basin and Kennedy Channel, and from Devon Island to the south by Jones Sound. Cape Columbia (83°06´ 41" N lat) is Canada's most northerly point of land.

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Fishing Islands

Fishing Islands, an archipelago of about 15 islets in Lake Huron (scattered in an area of 10 km2), lie off the west coast of the Bruce Peninsula in western Ontario between Chiefs Point and Pike Bay.

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Fogo Island

Fogo Island, Nfld, 254 km2, 15 km off Newfoundland's north-east coast, was named y do fogo, "fire island", by the Portuguese. The irregularly shaped island, heavily forested in the south, lies on shallow Fogo Shelf, which attracts salmon, cod and other species.

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Funk Island

Funk Island, 25 ha, is a flat, 15 m high, wedge-shaped granite island 800 m by 400 m lying 60 km off Newfoundland's northeast coast, east of FOGO ISLAND. The origin of the name is unknown, though it may have been inspired by the smell of the guano that covers much of the island.

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Galiano Island

Galiano Island, 5787 ha, is one of BC's GULF ISLANDS, named for Spanish navy commander Dionisio Alcalá-Galiano, who explored the area in 1792. It has the driest climate of the islands.

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Grand Manan Island

With a population of about 2500 - chiefly in the villages of North Head, Grand Harbour and Seal Cove - its chief industries are scallops, herring, lobster and salmon aquaculture, dulse (seaweed) gathering and tourism.

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Grosse Île and the Irish Memorial National Historic Site

Grosse Île is an island in the St. Lawrence Estuary, 46 km downstream from Quebec City. It is 2.9 km long and 1 km wide and consists of a wooded Appalachian ridge surrounded by a coastline of coves and capes. It is one of the 21 islands composing the Isle-aux-Grues archipelago. It has also been known as Île de Grâce and Quarantine Island. From 1832 to 1937, it was used as a quarantine station for the port of Quebec City. Over this century of activity, more than 4 million immigrants passed through this station, including nearly 90,000 during the “black year” of 1847. Closely tied to memories of Irish immigration to Canada, Grosse Île is a Canadian national historic site, administered by Parks Canada and open to the public.

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Gulf Islands

Their bucolic charm, calm waters, rich bird and marine life and mild climate, in the driest zone on Canada's Pacific coast, have attracted homesteaders and cottagers since about 1859. Stands of tall timber growing in deep soil were logged early in this century.

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Hans Island

Hans Island, Nunavut, is a tiny (1.3 km2), unpopulated island south of the 81st parallel in the Kennedy Channel (the northern part of Nares Strait), almost equidistant between ELLESMERE ISLAND and GREENLAND.

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Hornby Island

Hornby Island lies in the Strait of Georgia between Vancouver Island and mainland British Columbia, southeast of the island community of Courtenay . It is a wooded island with a shoreline of sandbanks and rock shelves.

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Île aux Coudres

Île aux Coudres, 30 km 2 , 11 km long, 4.3 km wide, 92 m high, is situated 60 km downstream from Québec City in the ST LAWRENCE RIVER estuary. The island consists of 2 Appalachian ridges joined by an embankment.

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Île Bonaventure

Despite its minute size, a favourable climate and abundant cod stocks induced French entrepreneurs to establish a seasonal fishery operation there in the 1600s. Simon Denys obtained seigneurial title (1674); his son Pierre had a chapel erected, soon thereafter razed by fire (1690).

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Ile d' Anticosti

Anticosti, Île d', 7943 km2, 222 km long and 56 km at its widest point, is located in the Gulf of ST LAWRENCE, athwart the entrance to the St Lawrence River. Though considerably larger than Prince Edward Island, its population is only about 250.

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Île d'Orléans

The island is connected by a suspension bridge to the North Shore near CHUTE MONTMORENCY. The largest island in the river after Île de Montréal, it is a relatively level plateau, 137 m at its highest point, and is quite steep-sided.

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Île de la Grande Entrée

Île de la Grande Entrée, Qué, is situated almost in the middle of the Gulf of ST LAWRENCE and flanked in the north by Île d' ANTICOSTI, in the south by PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND and on the east by CABOT STRAIT. It is one of the 16 islands and islets comprising Îles-de-la-MADELEINE.

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Île du Bic

Bic, Île du, uninhabited island, 14 km2, is located in the ST LAWRENCE R, 30 km west of Rimouski, Qué. Because of its advantageous position at the mouth of the St Lawrence near the natural harbour of Bic, it played a key military role under the French regime.