Browse "Cities"

Displaying 181-200 of 217 results
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St. John's

St. John's, NL, incorporated as a city in 1921, population 108,860 (2016 c), 106,172 (2011 c). The capital and largest city of Newfoundland and Labrador, the city of St. John's is located on the eastern side of the Avalon Peninsula of southeast Newfoundland. Its landlocked harbour is approached through a long, narrow channel and is protected by the high hills on which the city is built. The origin of the name St. John's is not known, but its use appears on a Portuguese map by Pedro Reinel (1516–20) as "Rio de San Johem" and later, in a 1527 letter by the English seaman John Rut, as the "Haven of St. John's." According to popular folklore, however, the city takes its name from the feast of Saint John the Baptist and the arrival of Italian explorer Giovanni Caboto (John Cabot) on the shores of Newfoundland on 24 June 1497.

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Steinbach

Steinbach, Manitoba, incorporated as a city in 1997, population 13 524 (2011c), 11 066 (2006c). The City of Steinbach is located 48 km southeast of WINNIPEG.

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Stratford

Urban growth was slow until the railway-building boom of the 1850s. Stratford businessmen lobbied for the forming in 1853 of the County of Perth, with Stratford as the county seat, and the county at once voted bonuses to railway companies.

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Sudbury

Greater Sudbury, Ontario, incorporated as a city in 2001, population 164,689 (2016 census), 163,067 (2011 census). The judicial seat for the District of Sudbury, the City of Greater Sudbury is located on the western shore of Ramsey Lake, about 60 km north of Georgian Bay. When incorporated in 2001, it replaced the former Regional Municipality of Sudbury (1973–2000) and City of Sudbury (1930–2000). The city owes much of its development to the mining industry, in particular the mining of nickel. The largest urban area in northeastern Ontario, Greater Sudbury now offers a concentration of business, cultural and educational services and is recognized for the impressive regreening program that it has been carrying out since the 1970s.

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Surrey

Surrey, BC, incorporated as a city in 1993, population 468 251 (2011c), 394 976 (2006c). The City of Surrey is the second-largest municipality by population in British Columbia, after VANCOUVER.

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Swift Current

Swift Current began to adopt the persona of a community in 1883 with the appearance of a dam, water tank, freight sheds, roadhouse and dining room. For many years it has served a large ranching, mixed-farming and grain-farming area.

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Terrace

Terrace, BC, incorporated as a city in 1987, population 11 486 (2011c), 11 320 (2006c).

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Terrebonne

Vieux Terrebonne is a veritable heritage storehouse. The historic buildings and landmarks of the old village centre recall the role played by the NORTH WEST COMPANY in the history of Terrebonne.

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Thetford Mines

In 1876 Joseph Fecteau scraped some fibres from a greenish rock with his fingernail; without realizing it, he had discovered ASBESTOS. In 1877 Roger Ward claimed the first mining rights and the Johnson brothers began production the following year.

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Thompson

Thompson, Manitoba, incorporated as a city in 1970, population 12 829 (2011c), 13 446 (2006c). The City of Thompson is located on the south side of the Burntwood River, 740 km north of Winnipeg.

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Thorold

Thorold, Ont, incorporated as a city in 1975, population 17 931 (2011c), 18 224 (2006c). The City of Thorold is situated on the NIAGARA PENINSULA. Though physically linked to ST CATHARINES, its large neighbour directly to the

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Thunder Bay

Thunder Bay, ON, incorporated as a city in 1970, population 107,909 (2016 census), 108,359 (2011 census). The City of Thunder Bay was created by the amalgamation of the cities of Fort William and Port Arthur and the townships of Neebing and McIntyre. It is located in northwestern Ontario on the west shore of the Lake Superior bay of the same name. Thunder Bay is situated on the traditional territory of the Anishinaabeg, and the land is covered by the Robinson-Superior Treaty. The Port of Thunder Bay is a western stop along the Great Lakes-St Lawrence Seaway. The region’s geography is dominated by the rocks, lakes and forests of the Canadian Shield. Surrounding communities depend on tourism or resource extraction, and look to Thunder Bay for a wide variety of services.

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Toronto

Toronto, Ontario, incorporated as a city in 1834, population 2,731,571 (2016 census), 2,615,060 (2011 census). Toronto is Ontario’s capital city, Canada’s largest municipality and the fourth largest city in North America. It is made up of the former cities of Toronto, North York, Scarborough, York and Etobicoke, and the former borough of East York. The city is home to a large immigrant population, and is a national and international hub for finance, communications and cultural life.

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Trois-Rivières

Trois-Rivières, Qué, City, pop 46 264 (2001c), 48 419 (1996c), 49 426 (1991c), 77.83 km2, inc 1857, the regional capital of Québec's Mauricie region, is located on the west shore of the mouth of Rivière Saint-Maurice​, midway between Québec City and Montréal. Its name derives from the 3-armed delta formed by the river's islands at its mouth.

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Val-Bélair

The name Bélair stems back to the original seigneury granted to Guillaume Bonhomme in 1682 by Governor Joseph-Antoine Le Febvre de LA BARRE and Intendant Jacques de MEULLES. In a 1733 census the seigneury was designated as "the fief commonly referred to as Bélair or Bonhomme.

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Vancouver

Vancouver, British Columbia, incorporated as a city in 1886, population 631,486 (2016c), 603,502 (2011c). Vancouver is the largest city in British Columbia and the third largest census metropolitan area in Canada. The City of Vancouver lies on a peninsula in the southwest corner of the province's mainland. Two surrounding waterways — Burrard Inlet and the Strait of Georgia — provide a sheltered deep-sea port and convenient access to the Pacific Ocean, while the Fraser River offers an easy route to the rich agricultural lands of the Fraser River Lowland and the interior. Railways and highways give easy access to the interior.

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Vanier (Qué)

Vanier, Qué, City, pop 11 054 (2001c), 11 174 (1996c), 10 833(1991c), area 4.59 km2, inc 1916, was originally named Québec-Ouest until 1966, when it was changed to Vanier in honour of Governor-General Georges-Philéas VANIER.

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Varennes

Canada's largest concentration of researchers in the field of ENERGY is concentrated in Varennes.

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Vaudreuil-Dorion

The area was granted to Philippe de Rigaud de VAUDREUIL in 1703. However, it was his successor, Michel Chartier de Lotbinière, who fostered the settlement and development of the seigneury that he had bought from the Vaudreuil family in 1763. The FUR TRADE and agriculture supported the local economy.